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Your neighborhood restaurant is finally allowed to serve cocktails

This could be happening at your favorite little bistro soon. Well OK, this particular guy won't be there. But you will!

This could be happening at your favorite little bistro soon. Well OK, this particular guy won't be there. But you will!

Tuesday was a very, very good day for progressives in Minnesota.

We sent two women back to the Senate, elected Ilhan Omar by a three-to-one margin, turned the state House blue, and turned out more mid-term voters than ever. (Literally.) Things went about as well as could be expected. 

In Minneapolis, there was good news for forward-thinking tippers (and tipplers), too. Voters passed ballot question No. 1, which means your friendly neighborhood restaurant now has the option to serve cocktails.

A refresher: There was an antiquated Minneapolis city charter that limited all-out liquor licenses to restaurants within a certain geographical range. Known as the "seven-acre rule," it meant that to serve hard alcohol, restaurants outside downtown Minneapolis had to be within a stretch of seven contiguous commercial districts.

Did your neighborhood hangout want a liquor license, prior to Tuesday? Sure! Have fun navigating the lengthy, costly, and terrible process that is obtaining an exemption from the state legislature!

Ballot question No. 1 let voters decide, with a "yes" vote, to chop the section of the charter giving the state legislature control over license applications. And on Tuesday, a majority of voters did just that. Question 1 passed by a 72 percent to 28 percent margin -- not quite as overwhelming as DFL U.S. Rep.-elect Ilhan Omar, but pretty damn decisive nonetheless.

Your favorite little bistro can't pop bottles of Patrón just yet; they'll still have to apply for a liquor license like anyone else. They'll also have to have a kitchen, a full menu, and make a “substantial amount of income from food sales.”

But either way, it's another blow to lingering Prohibition-era "blue law" booze restraints, and a big win for our ever-booming cocktail culture. (Y'all been to been to Colita yet?)