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Local Krispy Kreme doughnut smuggler/hero shut down by corporate overlords

The Krispy Kreme logo appears above its trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday, May 9, 2016 before it was taken private by JAB Beech in a deal worth approximately $1.35 billion. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

The Krispy Kreme logo appears above its trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday, May 9, 2016 before it was taken private by JAB Beech in a deal worth approximately $1.35 billion. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Associated Press

Business had been going so well for Jayson Gonzalez… 

Gonzalez (aka “The Donut Guy”) is the 21-year-old entrepreneur from Champlin who’s recently made headlines for making weekly Cannonball Runs across the Iowa border in pursuit of Krispy Kreme doughnuts.

You know, those trays of glazed goodness all of Minnesota was hooked on before the rug was pulled out from under us in 2008, when all of our Krispy Kremes abruptly closed? Yes, those treats.

As a senior studying accounting at Metropolitan State University in St. Paul, Gonzalez had worked out the math perfectly. By packing his Ford Focus with 100 boxes containing a dozen of the infamously covetable glazed pillows, he could make a pretty penny on each eight-hour Saturday trip, attacking his student loan debt in the process. Within two years, he’d be debt-free.

This not not-legal sweet smuggling business was run largely through Facebook, on a page with 3,700 followers called Krispy Kreme Run Minneapolis

It was here that Gonzalez broke the bad news, brought on by this recent spate of press. Gonzalez wrote, 

I have been told I have to shut down operations. I figured it would come eventually, but it arrived early with the surrounding articles. Life happens, and it could be a sign that something else it [sic] meant to be.

Per the Pioneer Press, “one of the big managers” at the confectionery’s Nebraska branch office put the Krispy kibosh on Gonzalez's operation. Accompanying a cease-and-desist were suggestions that Gonzalez’s sales had created a liability for the company. 

For dealing in a product that brings so many such joy, Krispy Kreme’s doom-lords seem hell-bent on quashing happiness and young upstart pluckery. They also seem blind to both Gonzalez’s entrepreneurial spirit and the (I’ll say it: desperate) lengths Minnesotans are willing to go to just to get their doughnuts. 

Congratulations, Krispy Kreme Corp.—everyone lost here today.

For his part, Gonzalez remained optimistic about the future. He teased the possibility of “entrepreneurial adventures” to come in his parting Facebook post. We only hope these ventures will be so bold and satisfying as his last.