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Lloyd Edward Johnson charged for pulling gun at Eden Prairie McDonald's

Lloyd Edward Johnson 'did everything he could to provoke this incident,' according to Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman.

Lloyd Edward Johnson 'did everything he could to provoke this incident,' according to Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman. Hennepin County

The Eden Prairie man whose bullying and threatening behavior toward Somali teenagers went Twitter-viral is finally facing some consequences. 

Lloyd Edward Johnson, 55, has been charged with felony terroristic threats, plus carrying a gun without a permit, a gross misdemeanor. Hennepin County Attorney Mike  Freeman says Johnson "did everything he could do provoke this incident," which started with Johnson's accusing two teenage girls of being on government welfare.

When one girl talked back, Johnson is alleged to have stepped toward her with his hand balled into a fist. Another girl went to retrieve their friends, who "verbally confronted" Johnson over his insult. 

At one point,  Johnson walked away, then returned with his cell phone out to record the argument. Things stayed heated, and at one point turned physical, as Johnson exchanged shoves with teenage boys.

On his way out the door, Johnson produced his pistol from a coat pocket; he later told police he'd done so because he "felt threatened by the group," and took out the gun "so he could leave the restaurant." He didn't confess to pointing the weapon, but did admit he might've waved it around a bit, per the criminal complaint.

Asked about referencing the girls' use of welfare, Johnson told cops: "That was an insult, I shouldn't have said that." 

Johnson went to his car and turned in the gun he'd brandished, a semi-automatic handgun, and admitted to police he didn't have the permit for it. 

Terroristic threats is punishable by up to a five-year prison sentence and/or $100,000 fine, and possessing a gun without a permit carries a maximum penalty of a year in jail and/or a $3,000 fine. 

Johnson has no prior criminal record in Minnesota, aside from a couple driving violations. 

"While [Johnson] is innocent until proven guilty, this is outrageous behavior," Mike Freeman said, "and it is only through sheer luck that no one was injured by his actions."