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Iron Range Republican Julie Buria deleted her QAnon tweets

"Have I looked at it? Yes. Do I believe all of it? No. I'm not really sure what to think about all that," Republican Julie Buria told the Associated Press.

"Have I looked at it? Yes. Do I believe all of it? No. I'm not really sure what to think about all that," Republican Julie Buria told the Associated Press. Facebook

We thought (with no small measure of relief) we’d run out of reasons to type the word QAnon when DFL U.S. Rep. Ilhan Omar’s onetime challenger, Danielle Stella, soundly lost the Republican primary election last month.

…You remember Stella, right? Got charged with shoplifting, may or may not have ended up in Wisconsin at some point, still got more of the vote than Dalia Al-Aqidi? (Lacy Johnson got the nomination with nearly 77 percent of the vote.)

We regret to inform you that we still have candidates for public office with their party’s nod in this state and beyond who either don't deny the QAnon conspiracy or subscribe wholeheartedly. If you've managed to block it out, QAnon is the massive, tangled, decentralized web of internet rumors involving an alleged pedophilia ring, a Deep State deepthroat, President Donald Trump being a secret genius freedom fighter, Wayfair, for a minute, and Pizzagate, a while back.

A recent piece from the Associated Press featured a few candidates who have posted references to QAnon or links to QAnon sites. They included Minnesota House candidate Julie Buria, the Republican running in House District 6B gunning to overthrow freshman Rep. Dave Lislegard (DFL-Aurora).

Buria, a realtor and Mountain Iron City Council member, is the candidate who posted a Facebook meme comparing COVID-related mask mandates to the Holocaust, including a photograph of concentration camp victims. Buria said she was sorry -- then said she'd been “forced” to apologize, that “Jews are not offended” by the comparison.

According to the AP, Buria has retweeted “at least four” QAnon-supportive posts in April and May, including one that read, “Link to new Q drop” with “several hashtags common to the conspiracy’s followers.”

“Have I looked at it? Yes,” she told the Associated Press. “Do I believe all of it? No. I’m not really sure what to think about all that.”

Any such posts have since been removed from her Twitter feed, creating a bit of a content gap between March and June. She didn’t respond to our interview requests to confirm or deny any of this, or to explain which parts she believed and which she didn’t.

There do appear to be some Q supporters among her followers, based on a smattering of the handles (@IronQRanger1) and hashtags (WWG1WGA, short for "Where we go one, we go all.”)