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Fergus Falls man accused of beating brother to death with a landscaping block

Nicholas Hauge, 28, was found standing near his younger brother's lifeless body.

Nicholas Hauge, 28, was found standing near his younger brother's lifeless body. Northwest Regional Corrections Center

A woman living in Fosston, Minnesota couldn’t sleep. She heard two men outside her house in the wee hours of Sunday morning.

“Get up,” she thought she heard one of them say. Moments passed, and she could hear one of the men talking. The other one, though… the other one was just moaning.

She looked outside and saw one throw something at the other, but she couldn’t tell what it was. She thought the impact sounded a little like a “pot.” She also thought she heard something thwack into the side of her house.

That’s when she called the Polk County Sheriff’s Office.

Deputies arrived to find a man standing in the road, another splayed out on the pavement near the curb. The man in the road, according to a complaint filed Monday, was 28-year-old Nicholas Hauge of Fergus Falls. His arms, T-shirt, and jeans were covered in blood.

So was the man lying on the ground. There was a large gash in his head, and a good amount of blood had already trickled into the gutter by the time deputies approached. Deputy Jacob Walker checked for a pulse. He couldn’t find one. After an attempt at CPR, the man was declared dead.

The deceased was 19-year-old Timothy Hauge – Nicholas’ younger brother. An autopsy would later reveal he died from blunt force trauma to the head. An investigator would find a hefty landscaping block outside a bedroom window about 20 yards away from Timothy’s body. It was about a foot long, six inches wide, and bloodstained on one corner.

The deputies put Nicholas in handcuffs and put him in Deputy Thomas Hibma’s patrol car. He was “uncooperative,” the complaint says, and he smelled strongly of alcohol.

“Just kill me,” he told the deputy.

The deputies didn’t kill him. Instead, he was taken to Northwest Regional Corrections Center and charged with two counts of second-degree murder. Each of these charges could get him up to 40 years in prison. Prosecutors intend to seek an aggravated sentence because they believe his brother was treated “with particular cruelty.”