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Ben Shapiro sues University of Minnesota over micro-aggression

Conservative writer Ben Shapiro was triggered after being forced to speak before the ag students on the St. Paul campus.

Conservative writer Ben Shapiro was triggered after being forced to speak before the ag students on the St. Paul campus. Gage Skidmore

Conservative lecturer Ben Shapiro and Students for a Conservative Voice are suing the University of Minnesota, contending the school discriminates against young people who have the belief systems of 70-year-old men.

The suit stems from a February 25 speech that was originally scheduled to take place at Willey Hall, a 1,000-seat venue on the Minneapolis campus. But after huge costs were incurred at a previous Shapiro speech in Berkeley, university officials ordered it moved to the smaller St. Paul Student Center for safety purposes.

The plan worked. Police blocked roads and kept protests peaceful, while Shapiro spoke to a packed room. Everyone looked nice in their blue blazers and golf slacks.

Yet Shapiro was apparently triggered by the incident. Though the St. Paul campus is but a quick, free shuttle away, he felt entitled to speak in Minneapolis, regardless of the taxpayer costs for additional security.

So Shapiro filed suit over the micro-aggression, arguing that being forced to speak before ag students in St. Paul amounted to a plot to "prohibit, chill, oppose and shut down speech with which they, or other students and faculty, disagree."

Some might regard the litigation as snowflakean, and believe that Shapiro is a cuck seeking a participation trophy via judicial activism. But that assertion is countered by his partners in the suit, which have the words “freedom” and “America” in their names, thus assuring their patriotic bona fides.

The Young America’s Foundation, which sponsored his speaking tour, is among the plaintiffs. The suit is being brought by lawyers for the Alliance Defending Freedom.