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A fab '70s fashion documentary and other indie flicks screening in November

'Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex Fashion & Disco'

'Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex Fashion & Disco'

Here are three indie flicks to check out this month.

Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex Fashion & Disco
Landmark Theatres
One week starting November 2

According to documentary director James Crump, the fashion explosion of the expressive and sensuous ’70s came not from a designer or model but an illustrator.

Fashion illustration was practical and procedural, like an industrial blueprint. Then came Antonio Lopez, whose drawings were filled with vibrancy and pomp. Normally, sketches would be merely a gray garment silhouette. Lopez’s designs, however, revealed a color-saturated scene, showcasing a certain narrative and lifestyle.

With insight and praise from contemporaries like Karl Lagerfeld and Grace Jones, this documentary is a dazzling look inside the world of ’70s fashion.

Wanda
Trylon Cinema
Various times November 2-4
$8

Written, directed, and starring Barbara Loden, Wanda (1970) is the story of a poor woman.

“I don't have anything. Never did have anything, never will have anything,” says Wanda.

After skipping town, she moves to random motels, starting and stopping shitty relationships and jobs.

Loden forgoes a musical score, opting instead for the banal hum of existence. The silence fills the lingering 16mm shots, making a child’s cry all the more devastating and a warm morning sun all the more glorious.

The Emigrants
Trylon Cinema
Various times November 23-25
$8

In The Emigrants (1971), Liv Ullmann and Max von Sydow play a married couple breaking from the pressure of bad harvests and religious upheaval in Sweden in the 1800s. Soon, the family will make a break for Minnesota.

Jan Troell’s sparse but subtle and stylistic tale is about the details: the silent exchange of concerned looks between an unsure mother and her hungry children, the uncertainty that their grueling trek will lead to a better life.

Troell omits typical picturesque pioneer pretense for the reality that hope is all the prosperity they may ever know.